St Jude

How this Fast Diet Lifestyle works: Eat these meals tomorrow, for a calorie total of less than 600. On another day this week, eat the meals from a different post, another day of eating 600 calories or less. Eat sensibly the other days of the week. That’s it. Simple way to lose weight and be healthier. Welcome to Godly Chic Diaries who is now Following.

You might know St Jude as the patron saint of hopeless causes or impossible cures. What you might not know is that he was Jesus’ first cousin and that his real name was probably Judas. To avoid confusion with that other Judas, biblical scholars began calling him Jude or Thaddeus. Jude was one of the original 12 apostles along with his brother James. Little is known about him except that he traveled to many areas of the Levant, preaching, teaching, and healing, often in difficult or ‘impossible’ circumstances. He is better known today for the children’s hospital named for him.

To highlight Jude’s region of origin and travel, we have breakfast containing ingredients that he would recognize and a Greek-style fish for dinner. Dieting shouldn’t be impossible. If you start the Fast Diet tomorrow, you could lose 5 pounds by the start of Hannuka [at the rate of 1 pound per week]. At the same rate, one could lose 8-10 pounds by Christmas. Give it a try — maybe St Jude can bolster your resolve.

Fig & Chevre Plate: 153 calories 8.4 g fat 2.2 g fiber 7.8 g protein 13.4 g carbs [12 g Complex] 163 mg Calcium  NB: The food values shown are for the cheese, egg, fig, and spinach, not for the optional beveragesPB GF Simple, elegant, and more filling than it looks.

½ hard-boiled egg 1 dried fig, 0.65 oz/ 16 g 1 oz chevre cheese ¼ oz baby spinach leaves Optional: blackish coffee [53 calories] or blackish tea or mocha cafe au lait [65 calories]https://wordpress.com/block-editor/post/fastingme.com/12243 Optional: 5 oz fruit smoothie or berry-yogurt smoothie https://wordpress.com/post/fastingme.com/11792 [88 calories]

Rehydrate the dried fig by covering with water and microwaving or heating for 1 minute. Let the fig sit in the water for another few minutes, then cut in half. Arrange the spinach leaves in an oval. Dab the leaves with crumbles of the goat cheese. Plate the egg half and the fig halves.  HINT: I composed the plate the night before, covered it with a plastic bag, and kept it cool until breakfast. Instant breakfast!

Greek-style Hake:  263 calories 11 g fat 7.7 g fiber 25.5 g protein 24 g carbs [23 g Complex] 173 mg Calcium   PB GF  The cookbook Ikaria by Diane Kochilas is related to the National Geographic study of locations world-wide where there is the greatest longevity. Thinking that nutrition has something to do with it is one direction that could take you.

4 oz hake ½ tsp olive oil 1/3 cup onions, halved then sliced ½ clove garlic, sliced pinch sugar 1.5 cup canned whole tomatoes 1 Tbsp [½ oz] dry red wine 1.5 Tbsp good Feta cheese, crumbled 2.5 oz asparagus OR one Side Salad [see Second Fiddles  9-Jan-’19]

Saute the onion slices and garlic in the ½ tsp oil, adding some water if the pan becomes too dry. Remove garlic and discard. Add tomatoes, sugar, and wine. Cook the vegetables down to reduce the liquid. Lay the fish on top of the vegetables, cover loosely, turn down the heat and cook until the fish flakes [about 10 minutes]. Meanwhile, prepare the asparagus or Side Salad. Top the fish with the crumbled Feta before serving.

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