Camargue

How this Fast Diet Lifestyle works: Eat these meals tomorrow, for a calorie total of less than 600. On another day this week, eat the meals from a different post, another day of eating 600 calories or less. Eat sensibly the other days of the week. That’s it. Simple way to lose weight and be healthier. Welcome to Senior Accredited Psychotherapist London UK and ketobenefit7 who are now Following.

The Rhone River begins above Lake Geneva [Lac Leman] and flows southward through France to the Mediterranean. At its mouth it is transformed into a vast marshland called the Camargue. If you stopped at ‘marshland’ and thought of Shrek’s swamp, think again. The Camargue is acres of shimmering water, waving grasses, grazing cattle, ‘salt pans,’ mariculture, and rice meadows inhabited by wild white horses, black ‘fighting’ bulls, and hardy people. The Romans were here early on and they taught the people how to harvest salt from the shallows. Rice production grew after a Marshall Plan project to promote the grain in the Camargue. White rice was planted, but over time, the rice grains became red. No one knows why. But did you know that flamingoes are pink because they eat shrimp that eat certain algae? Flamingoes live in the Camargue, along with hundreds of other species of birds. And did you know that Mary Magdelane lived there, along with Sara the Black Madonna? So legend tells us. The Camargue is a magical place, so different from the glitzy tourist spots along the coast that it might be in a separate country. If you can’t visit there, then at least enjoy the food from the Camargue.

The menu for today includes the flavors of the Mediterranean coast and the products of the Camargue.

Olive-Pepper ScrOmelette:  144 calories 9 g fat 2 g fiber 10 g protein 5 g carbs [3 g Complex] 27.4 mg Calcium NB: Food values shown are for the ScrOmelette and fruit only, and do not include the optional beverages.  PB GF  I asked Dear Husband for a new omelette idea, and he suggested these flavors straight out of Provence.

1½ two-oz eggs  HINT: If you are serving one person, crack three 2-oz eggs into a small bowl or glass measuring cup. Whip up those eggs and pour half of their volume, crack three 2-oz eggs into a jar with a lid and put it in the ‘fridge for next week.  ½ oz bell pepper, steamed and diced 1 black olive, pitted and chopped  1/8 oz [by mass] goat cheese/chèvre, diced/crumbled 1 oz strawberries  Optional: blackish coffee [53 calories] or blackish tea or mocha cafe au lait [65 calories] or lemon in hot water   Optional: 5 oz fruit smoothie or berry-yogurt smoothie  [88 calories]

Whisk the eggs [salt may not be needed due to saltiness of olives]. Pour into a pan which has been sprayed briefly with cooking spray. When the bottom of the eggs have set, add the vegetables and cheese. Fold over, and plate. Brew your optional beverage and take the optional previously-made smoothie from ‘fridge.

Camargue Bowl:  288 calories 4 g fat  10 g fiber 23.5 g protein 29 g carbs 98.5 mg Calcium  PB GF  This meal is all about the flavors and products of the central Mediterranean coast of France, the Rhone Delta: vegetables from sunny gardens, garbanzo beans [introduced by the Berbers], shrimp from the shallows, and Camargue rice from the salt marshes. HINT: This recipe serves 2 [two] and it is worth making the whole thing.

1 ½ cups Mediterranean Vegetables, without chickpeas  1 cup chickpeas 4.5 oz shrimp, shelled, tails removed, cut in ½” pieces if large ½ cup cooked red Camargue rice

Drain and rinse the chickpeas, if canned. Gently heat the Vegetables and chickpeas until warm. Place the shrimp on top. Cover the pan and heat further until the shrimp are cooked, about 6 minutes. Stir in the cooked rice and heat through. Heap the servings into bowls and love it.

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